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Table of Contents
§ Downloadable reports
NEUMES 2006 conference proceedings
Publications
Interim Project Report
§ Program sourcecode
Transcription visualization script
Java classes: NeumesXML Schema
Glyphs Manifest visualization script
§ Archive
Documents (archival)
Program sourcecode (archival)
help resourcesHelp resources:
Software Design help Software Design help


Downloadable Reports


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  —  NEUMES 2006 conference proceedings  —     
cross-reference See also, the Project Scrapbook pages about this conference.
  • Leo Treitler, "Know Your Notator"; NEUMES 2006 Oxford Conference on Computerised Transcription of Medieval Chant Manuscripts, (St Anne's College, Oxford, 27-28 June 2006).
    [PDF format; file size 241 kB]

    Abstract: In this paper Prof. Treitler explores some of the principal themes of this conference: uncertainty of interpretation in transcribing source manuscripts; problems in classifying neume notation types; segmentation of a chant along textual criteria; and so on. Among the key points he raises are: that musical notation ought to be regarded as "notational text" (or, writing without words); that notational signs might represent not the song, but rather the singing of it ... or even something that has no real counterpart beyond the notation itself; and that a transcriber needs to "know" the notator. Included is an example of the analysis done by Max Haas on a corpus of chant.

  • John Caldwell, "Towards a Classification of Western Chant Notations"; NEUMES 2006 Oxford Conference on Computerised Transcription of Medieval Chant Manuscripts, (St Anne's College, Oxford, 27-28 June 2006).
    [PDF format; file size 43.6 kB]

    Abstract: Prof. Caldwell proposes a new classification scheme for types of Western chant notation. His method focuses on the characteristic features of fundamentally different approaches to the scribal problem of notating chant. The result is a simple, easy-to-understand taxonomy that avoids many of the problems inherent to earlier schemes that classify notations by geographical region, historical period, and/or religious congregation.

    Audio: Excerpts from Prof. Caldwell's presentation at the 'NEUMES 2006' conference.
    Requirements: JavaScript enabled in your browser, and a Flash® player installed.

    Audio excerpt: "What is a neume?"
    [Filesize: 1½ MB. Play length: 9 minutes. Format: MP3, streaming audio.
    Audio excerpt: "On the classification of Western styles of neumation."
    [Filesize: 4¼ MB. Play length: 18 1½ minutes. Format: MP3, streaming audio.
  —  Publications  —     

  • Louis W. G. Barton, Peter G. Jeavons, John A. Caldwell, and Koon Shan Barry Ng, "First Class Objects and Indexes for Chant Manuscripts," Proceedings of the 7th ACM / IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (Building & Sustaining the Digital Environment), (Association for Computing Machinery, 2007), pp. 415-416.
    [PDF format; file size 306 kB]

    Copyright notice: Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, or republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee.
    JCDL'07, June 18-23, 2007, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    Copyright 2007 ACM 978-1-59593-644-8/07/0006…$5.00.

  • Louis W. G. Barton, John A. Caldwell, and Peter G. Jeavons, "E-Library of Medieval Chant Manuscript Transcriptions," Proceedings of the 5th ACM / IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (Digital Libraries: Cyberinfrastructure for Research and Education), (Association for Computing Machinery, 2005), pp. 320-329.
    [PDF format; file size 636 kB]

    Copyright notice: Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, or republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee.
    JCDL'05, June 7-11, 2005, Denver, Colorado, USA
    Copyright 2005 ACM 1-58113-876-8/05/0006…$5.00.

  • Louis W. G. Barton, "The NEUMES Project: Digital Transcription of Medieval Chant Manuscripts," Proceedings of the Second International Conference on WEB Delivering of Music, (IEEE Computer Society, 2002), pp. 211-218.
    [PDF format; file size 236 kB]

    Copyright notice: 0-7695-1623-8/02 $17.00
    Copyright © 2002 by The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

  —  Interim Project Report  —     

Report Title Date Format File Size

Interim Project Report (draft)
11 August 2002 PDF 367 kB
Authors: Louis W. G. Barton, et al. Gives details of the Project's software design and reasons for design decisions (57 pages).

Remarks: This year-2002 report from the Phase One initiative is out-of-date. Many of the data design specifications have changed since that time. A current report is being written.



Program Sourcecode

  —  Transcription Visualization Script  —     

  • Beta-test visualization transform (XSLT and JavaScript definition file):
    NeumesXML.xsl [ver. 2.2.i; 13 April 2004; HTML view].
    This is the beta-test version of the XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) Transformation definition that generates the canonical visualization of NEUMES transcription data and NeumesXML meta-data.

    Abstract
    Many different visualizations (or, data views) of a NEUMES/NeumesXML transcription are possible. The canonical visualization is intended to be the 'standard' or default method of viewing transcriptions graphically in a Web browser. The document object model we are using is comprised of XSLT, JavaScript, and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), with output in HTML format. This script is designed to be executable entirely on the client-side (i.e., by the end-user's browser), such that transcriptions may be located anywhere on the Web (or even on the end-user's hard drive). The only dependency is that the end-user's browser must have access to this XSLT definition file and associated files. (In principle, these files could be replicated in many places on the Web.)

    Currently, however, most browsers do not handle XSL Transformations correctly, and so this part of the model normally is executed on the Project's Scribe server. We expect, however, that the next generation of browser technology will allow XSL Transformations to be done on the client-side, and preclude this dependency on a particular server. (For instance, there is currently a task force in the Mozilla browser project who are working on integration of XSLT support into Mozilla.)

    Remarks
    The beta-test visualization is intended mainly for use by our Project team in testing the underlying software and for verifying NEUMES character data. Further, we intend that (in keeping with the Project's policy of openness) the public can inspect the current state of progress in the Project. Please note, however, that we are not claiming that the beta-test visualization generates a "diplomatic facsimile" of source artifacts -- although this is our goal.

    This definition file depends on the XSLT Utilities for NeumesXML [q.v.].
    The current version works with the NeumesXML Schema 2.3. The transform uses the SAX document-processing model (viz., sequential access, event-driven).

  • XSLT Utilities for NeumesXML (XSLT definition file):
    NeumesXSLT_utils.xsl [ver. 1.0.b; 13 April 2004; HTML view].
    This is a collection of XSLT templates for manipulating the content of NeumesXML files or 'raw' NEUMES character data. These templates have been separated from the visualization transform definition so that they may be reused in creating new XSL Transformations for NeumesXML. (Please see the licensing restrictions stated within the NeumexXSLT_utils.xsl file before reusing this sourcecode.)

    Remarks: The utilities are fully documented on the XSLT Utilities for NeumesXML page [HTML view], including technical details about how to use these utilities.

  • Java Servlet, visualization transform (Java™ sourcecode):
    NeumesXSLTServlet.java [ver. 1.2; 10 April 2006; HTML view].
    This program runs on the Project's Scribe server (server-side only). It retrieves a NeumesXML transcription file that is specified in a request from the client (the file may be located anywhere on the Web, or it can be pushed to the server from the end-user's hard drive). It transforms the NeumesXML meta-data and NEUMES transcription data to beta-test visualization by using an XSLT transform definition (see "NeumesXSL.xsl"), and sends the resulting HTML file to the client browser.

    Remarks: We expect that transforms will eventually be done on the client-side by the next generation of Web browsers (and eliminate this dependency on the Scribe server); in the meantime, however, we shall continue providing this functionality on the Scribe server for browsers that do not process XSLT correctly.

 
  —  Java Classes for the NeumesXML Schema  —     

  • Sourcecode of Java™ classes corresponding to the Elements of the NeumesXML Schema : NeumesXML_schema_Java_src.zip [generated from the NeumesXML Schema ver. 2.3.b; 25 October 2005; file size 361 kB].

    Remarks: Our purpose in creating Java sourcecode files from the Schema is for use in dynamically generating parts of the data-entry program. These sourcecode files were generated using XMLBeans version 1.0.4. (Compilation of this Schema to Java sourcecode does not work in XMLBeans version 2.0.0.)

    To compile the NeumesXML Schema for Eastern chant sources, execute the following from the command line:
      scomp -dl -src NeumesXML_east_src -srconly NeumesXML_east.xsd

    To compile the NeumesXML Schema for Western chant sources, execute the following from the command line:
      scomp -dl -src NeumesXML_west_src -srconly NeumesXML_west.xsd
     

  • Object-oriented (OO) diagram showing the principal classes and methods of the Java sourcecode [25 October 2005; file size 5 kB].
     
 
  —  Glyphs Manifest: Visualization Script  —     

  • Visualization transform (XSLT definition file):
    glyphs_manifest.xsl [ver. 1.1.c; 13 February 2006; HTML view].
    This is the XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) Transformation definition that generates the visualization of Glyphs Manifest XML data for glyph image sets.

 
 

Archive

  —  Archival Documents  —     
  • "About the Phase One Initiative." Funding and personnel credits, mission, and results of the Phase One Project (now completed). [HTML format]
  • "Digital Encoding for Medieval Chant Transcription," Thomas Forrest Kelly and Louis W. G. Barton. Scholarly Communications grant proposal to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation: gives an overview of the Project and its Phase One goals. [17 July 2001; 17 pages; PDF format; file size 1.2 MB]
  • "Preliminary Taxonomy of Neume Forms," Ruth Ripley (Oxford Chant Group) and Louis Barton (NEUMES Project). Design document for the NEUMES taxonomy. [draft version; HTML format]
  • "Risk Analysis Report," Clare McInerney. Risk analysis about migrating the NeumesXML from DTD to XML Schema, including prospects for maintaining compatibility with the Digital Scriptorium transcription DTD for medieval text manuscripts. [final; HTML format]
  • Announcement: "Second Meeting of the Project Advisory Board," 25-26 January 2003, Department of Music, Harvard University. [HTML format]
  • Announcement: "First Meeting of the Project Advisory Board," 6-7 October 2001, Department of Music, Harvard University. [HTML format]
 
  —  Archival Program Sourcecode  —     
  • "DTDParser," (author: Clare McInerney). This is a Java™-language program that reads the NeumesXML DTD file. For each DTD Element, it writes an HTML file containing detail information about the Element per its definition in the DTD. The program also writes a file containing a list of the HTML detail files generated. The detail HTML files were intended to be used in conjunction with an online visual tree of the NeumesXML tag hierarcy, such that users could examine the structure and content of the DTD in an intuitive manner. [final; 6 February 2003; ZIP files]
    DTDParser_src.zip contains the program sourcecode and documentation. [file size 170 kB]
    DTDParser_obj.zip contains the compiled Java classes and the HTML output files. [file size 77 kB]

    Remarks: This program was deprecated with the migration of NeumesXML from DTD to XML Schema. It is no longer in use.

  • "NEUMES Transcription Editor," (author: Brad Maiani). Data-entry program alpha-version prototype in the C# programming language. [16 November 2002; ZIP file; file size 122 kB]

    Remarks: This is a 'throw-away' prototype of the data-entry program. We have abandoned it, since it did not meet our design criteria: principally as follows.
    (a) It is platform-dependent, in that it was written in the C# ™ programming language (instead of the platform-independent Java™ language) and is intimately tied to a Microsoft .NET ™ server running Windows XP ™ and IIS 5 ™.
    (b) The program can be run only on the server-side (whereas the specifications call for a data-entry program that will run on end-users' computers).
    (c) Transcriptions must be kept in a database, which breaks the Project's design principle that transcriptions shall be self-contained files, visible as "first-class objects" on the Web.
    The sourcecode of this program is provided here just to account for part of the Project expense. This downloadable ZIP file contains all program code and documentation that was delivered under contract. (See, sample screenshot [file size 94 kB] showing the program in operation.)

 

Protected by law under one or more of the following copyrights:
Copyright 2005-2007, The University of Oxford.
Copyright 2003-2005, Louis W. G. Barton.
Copyright 2002-2003, The President and Fellows of Harvard College; contains software or other intellectual property licensed from Louis W. G. Barton, copyright 1995-2001 by Louis W. G. Barton.